Scotland: Barking Dogs

Glasgow Necropolis, Entrance
Glasgow Necropolis, Entrance

It was another early start this morning.  First up was Glasgow Necropolis.  In addition to being one of the most notable burial grounds in Europe, it also offers one of the highest views of Glasgow.  Between the location, design, grandeur and quality of the markers, this was a remarkable experience.

Necropolis Statue
Necropolis Statue

The church that you see in many of the pictures is Glasgow Cathedral.  The church is allegedly the location from which Saint Mungro built his original church.  The church was built in the 12th century and is just awe inspiring.  I have many pictures and video from inside the church, but the shear size of the vaulted ceilings can’t be captured easily.  In the basement are many smaller alters, each of which holds it’s own charm.  One of the rooms was closed for continued taping of the next season of Outlander.

One of the lower alters, Glasgow Cathedral
One of the lower alters, Glasgow Cathedral

Across the road is the oldest house in Glasgow, Provand’s Lordship.  The house was turned into a very nice museum with original antiques and artwork from the period.  It’s garden, which can be viewed from within the house, was used for growing medical herbs for the University of Glasglow on High Street back in the 17th century.

Provand's Lordship House
Provand’s Lordship House

The stained glass windows in the house were purchased and installed in the early 1900s, but the glass itself were ancient and very well done.

Sample window from Provand's Lordship House
Sample window from Provand’s Lordship House

Next up … a little antique shopping.  The open marked was a bust, and the travel agent was right when she noted this wasn’t an area we’d want to be in.  It was the only section of the city I wouldn’t want to be walking down at night.  But, we still found a decent shop where Shannon purchased some antique place card holders.  They did have some nicer large pieces, but we’ll be hard pressed to get everything back on the plane as it is.

It’s also worth noting that some of the antiques contained German war memorabilia that you wouldn’t see in similar shops in the U.S.

Antique shop in Glasgow
Antique shop in Glasgow

Next, onto the People’s Palace off Glasgow Green.  Our primary destination here was the Billy Connelly art exhibit.

Connelly art exhibit at People's Palace.
Connelly art exhibit at People’s Palace

The exhibit itself was a bust, but the grounds were amazing.  Other items in the museum were also nice, but it was so warm in there, I had to get outside before we saw the entire thing.

Fountain outside the People's Palace
Fountain outside the People’s Palace

From there back into the shopping district where street performers continued to amaze.  Everything from soccer ball footwork to folk singers.  We heard songs like Hallelujah being sung in different languages, bag pipers and even some strange violin / trumpet fusion.

Street performer juggling fire
Street performer juggling fire

We stopped for a very late lunch at a great Italian restaurant.  Two pints of beer and an outstanding meal and we were back on the pavement heading toward the hotel.

Our original plan was to drop off bags and head back out.  Nope.  We’re both done.  We literally walked for miles today … most of it up hills and stairs.  Our dogs are barking and once we took off the shoes, we weren’t going anywhere.  Overall, the trip is starting to take a toll on us.  We’ve been on the go for days, walking, driving, packing, moving to the next spot and repeating.  Yesterday we got caught in a downpour and today Shannon is starting to feel the onset of a cold.  So, we’re going to do a little room service tonight and lay low.

We have another day in Glasgow tomorrow and then back to Edinburgh tomorrow evening.  Although there is so much more to see and do in this city, I’m thinking we might just make it a very low key day.  We’ll see how rejuvenated we feel in the morning.

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